Scaling Enterprise Applications and all that jazz: Terracotta, GigaSpaces, and Azul

I like scaling and the architectures that attempt to solve those issues. Below I tried to bullet point 3 prominent players in this area, all solving scaling problems with different architectures at different levels.

  • Terracotta 3.1
    • Clustering JVM using Network attached Memory
    • Only the field-level changes are sent over the network
    • Uses TCP to communicate within cluster
    • Open Source and recently acquired EHCache
  • GigaSpaces
    • Cloud enabled Middleware Platform (PaaS)
    • Space Based Architecture” – inspired by JavaSpaces
    • Partitioning & Co-location as essence: Ulitmate goal: “share nothing architecture” – eliminate costs of copying
  • Azul Systems
    • Proxy JVM with transparent redeploy to Azul Hardware
    • Integrated hardware, kernel and JVM Design
    • Build their own Multicore System running their own Chips
    • Systems are high number of cores
    • Optimistic Thread Concurrency & Pauseless Garbage Collection Technology

Terracotta @ JavaOne
http://www.dailymotion.com/videox9jpam

Gigaspaces Highlevel:


Azul – Very technical Google TechTalk

YouTube Preview Image

Many new developments also in the cloud space. What is your favorite scaling technology?

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3 Comments

  1. Jeffrey Sultanj
    Posted August 22, 2009 at 8:10 pm | Permalink

    Interesting.. I would add database sharding, and memchached what many web2.0 sites have. Keep posting enjoy the blog!

  2. krao7
    Posted August 23, 2009 at 3:16 pm | Permalink

    Hey! I would like to have a more extensive comparison of different scaling architectures here.

  3. Posted August 23, 2009 at 6:52 pm | Permalink

    @Jeffrey, @krao7 Thanks for your comments. I have deliberately just picked 3 solutions that picked my eye recently. It is definitely an interesting subject, I hope I get some time to work on an more extensive architectural comparison soon!